Go To Neighborhood: 


By Bill Chenevert

Realtor and chorus saver

2015 marks nearly 20 years of Philadelphia life for Paul Fontaine, a Rhode Island native who came to the area for an MBA at Villanova University.

Posted Oct. 9, 2015


By Joseph Myers

Don Quixote Tapas & Things’ Albondigas

An affinity for family has always proven the foremost factor in helping Vanessa Flacco to craft her culinary identity.

Posted Oct. 9, 2015

Checking out the chicken

On Monday, The Boyler Room, 328 South St., will offer its chicken sandwich of the week for half off, with a free poker tournament through Riverchasers commencing at 7:30 p.m.

Posted Oct. 1, 2015

Brunches that pack punches

Two-month-old Whetstone Tavern, 700 S. Fifth St., recently began to offer brunch service from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on weekdays and 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. on weekends.

Posted Sep. 17, 2015


By Joseph Myers

Queen Village casualty

A man is in custody for allegedly murdering a fellow North Philly resident in Queen Village.

Posted Sep. 10, 2015

An Ela-gant idea

Chef Jason Cichonski, who soon will open 1100 Social within Xfinity Live! Philadelphia, 1100 Pattison Ave., has not lost any love for enticing patrons to his initial brainchild, Ela, 627 S. Third St.

Posted Aug. 28, 2015


By Joseph Myers

Fiery details

Authorities charged a New Jersey man with the April 2014 attempted arson of a Queen Village space.

Posted Aug. 20, 2015


By Joseph Myers

Tired of the nonsense

Law enforcement officials are seeking input from the public following the slashing of car tires in Queen Village.

Posted Aug. 13, 2015


By Joseph Myers

New Wave Café’s Seared Scallops

Numerous vocations include stories of superb feats from substitutes, with sports offering particularly compelling accounts. When employed at the Old Original Bookbinders, Evans Herbert showed that food fill-ins can prove as efficient as their renowned peers, assisting the Old City location when a colleague cut himself. That slice of fortune has led to commendable culinary experiences, with the last seven years yielding thrills at New Wave Café, 784 S. Third St. “I’m very passionate about the food that I put out here,” the resident of the 300 block of Jackson Street said of his stint at the Queen Village spot that is celebrating its 30th anniversary. “I want to keep everything simple and flavorful because doing so is a reflection of my feeling that I like to serve what I like to eat.” The self-taught 40-year-old took over the space’s kitchen two years into his relationship with founders Sam and Aly Lynagh and Nate Ross and estimates that he can call 98 percent of the expansive menu his handiwork. One might expect a former hire at Oyster House to possess a penchant for seafood, and the Whitman inhabitant gladly confessed his attraction to aquatic goodies. “I love preparing various items, but it’s my...

Posted Aug. 7, 2015

Whetstone Tavern’s Passyunk Pork

When is Whetstone Tavern supposed to open?

Posted Jul. 30, 2015


By Bill Chenevert

All about the dogs

In coordination with National Hot Dog Month, South Street Headhouse District put on the Fourth Annual Dog Days of Summer Cook Off Saturday.

Posted Jul. 23, 2015


By Joseph Myers

Not registering

A man remains at large after committing commercial burglaries in Queen Village and East Passyunk Crossing.

Posted Jul. 16, 2015


Queen Village

Boundaries: Lombard Street to Washington Avenue, the Delaware River to Sixth Street.


Origin of Name: William Penn called it Southwark because it reminded him of a similar neighborhood on the south bank of the Thames River in London.

In the late 1970s, it was renamed Queen Village after Queen Christina of Sweden to recognize her role in promoting the original settlements. Although some say Queen Village encompasses Southwark, the latter is still used for the adjacent neighborhood.


Brief history: Settled by the Swedes in the 1600s and originally named Wicaco, it was deemed a “peaceful place” using the Lenni Lenape tribal word. William Penn changed the name to Southwark.
The Swedes mostly lived along Christian Street. In 1699, they built a wood-framed church at Front and Christian streets. The following year, it was consecrated Gloria Dei (Old Swedes’) Church, and exists today at 916 S. Swanson St.

Commercial activities were very prominent and maritime jobs were plentiful. Residents worked as shipbuilders, rope- and sail-makers, sailors, dock workers, carpenters and craftsmen.
Southwark was officially recognized as a community in 1854.

Spanish-speaking immigrants arrived in the 19th century, and found housing and work in this neighborhood.

Members of the Cuban Revolutionary Party also lived in Southwark, and a cigar-making industry thrived. The Bayuk Brothers Tobacco Co., for example, was the largest cigar producer in Philadelphia in the early 20th century.

One beacon of the nautical era still stands in Queen Village. It is the steeple of the 158-year-old Emanuel Evangelical Lutheran Church, 1001 S. Fourth St., which guided ships across the Delaware River. During the late 1950s, the church became an unofficial community center, offering its facilities to neighborhood groups, youth workers and civic-betterment organizations.

In 2000, the Courtyard Apartments at Riverview, Fifth Street and Washington Avenue, replaced the two towers at Southwark Plaza. When the old housing development was imploded, neighbors worried about damage to Emanuel Church’s steeple, but it survived unscathed.

Another old building, Mount Sinai Hospital, Fourth and Reed streets, and its surrounding blocks also have undergone a conversion. The hospital closed in 1998, and construction on the Jefferson Square housing complex began soon after, spanning mostly neighboring Pennsport but also part of Queen Village.


Famous Residents: Twist originator Chubby Checker, formerly of the 500 block of Christian Street; Brother Bill McDonald, who worked with the Servants of the Poor to provide food and clothing to the neighborhood needy, was locally well-known; painter/sculptor/filmmaker/photographer Man Ray, who participated in the Cubist, Dadaist and Surrealist art movements;  Sacramento Kings and La Salle University basketball star Lionel “L-Train” Simmons; and the first mayor of Philadelphia, William Shippen; Larry Fine, born Louis Feinberg, one of the Three Stooges, of Third and South streets


Major Landmarks: Emanuel Evangelical Lutheran Church, formerly at 1001 S. Fourth St., and its steeple; the former Southwark Towers; Sparks’ Shot Tower, the first shot tower built in the United States and one of only three remaining, is surrounded by a playground at Front and Carpenter streets; Betsy Ross was married at Gloria Dei (Old Swedes’) Church, now a National Historic Landmark; Theatre Of Living Arts, 334 South St.; Jefferson Square, Mummers Museum, 1100 S. Second St.; South Street


Architecture: Single-family units, townhouses


U.S. Congressional District: 1st, Bob Brady (D)

U.S. Senators: Bob Casey (D); Pat Toomey (R)

Pennsylvania Governor: Tom Corbett (R)

State House District: 175th, Michael H. O'Brien (D)

City Council District: 1st, Mark Squilla (D)

Ward: 2nd

Police District: 3rd, Capt. Michael Ryan; Community Relations Officers Ace Delgado and Gary Harkins;

Civic Groups: Queen Village Neighbors Association, Queen Village Town Watch.

Libraries: Santore, 932 S Seventh St.

Schools: William Meredith Elementary, 725 S. Fifth St.; Settlement Music School, 416 Queen St.

Places of Worship: Emanuel Lutheran Church, Fourth and Carpenter streets; Gloria Dei Old Swede's Church, 916 S. Swanson St.; Greater Mount Olive AME Church, 19 Fitzwater St.; Nazareth Baptist Church, 1009 S. Third St.; Phillips Temple Christian Methodist Church, 754 S. Third St.; Sayers Memorial United Methodist Church, 61 Catharine St.; St. John the Evangelist, Third and Reed streets; St. Phillips Neri Church, 218 Queen St.; St. Stanislaus, 242 Fitzwater St.

Rec Centers: Palumbo Rec, 10th and Fitzwater streets, in Bella Vista; Rizzo Rink, 1001 S. Front St., in Pennsport

Parks/Gardens: Mario Lanza Park, Second and Catharine streets; Moyamensing Point, Second and Christian; Shot Tower, Front and Carpenter streets; Weccacoe, 405-25 Queen St.; Bodine Street Community Garden, 914 S. Bodine St. and 939-941 S. Third St.; Southwark Queen Village Community Garden, 311-15 Christian St.; Washington Avenue Green, Columbus Boulevard and Washington Avenue


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